Contributor Spotlight: Amaranth Borsuk

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My contribution to “The Kinetic Page” is a kind of poetics statement about my collaboration Abra, with Kate Durbin and Ian Hatcher. Our goal was to make a book that pushes away from and beyond the notion of the single author, while also investigating the mutation of the book through history. It is a project that has many elements: a limited edition artist’s book, a free iPad and iPhone app, and a beautiful illustrated paperback published by 1913 Press. All three versions look for ways to animate language and to invite the reader to think of both the page and screen as touchable interfaces for creating their own texts. Continue Reading

Contributor Spotlight: Katharyn Howd Machan

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In January of 2011, my husband Eric shared with me an article he’d found about a hunter in Belarus who injured a fox and approached it with the butt end of the rifle to finish it off; the fox resisted, somehow got its paw on the trigger, and shot the hunter (not fatally, of course, which is why we know the story) before running off. It somehow got me writing poems about Fox, a shape-shifter who can be fully human or fully animal or a mix, always her choice. Continue Reading

Contributor Spotlight: Lois Marie Harrod

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Novelist Ann Tyler says that she reads so that she can live more than one life in more than one place. I write for the same reason. My character Marlene Mae lives a brash, reckless life, quite unlike my own more careful and calculating existence. I thought I was done with Marlene Mae in 2013 when Dancing Girl Press published the chapbook How Marlene Mae Longs for the Truth, but she (and her mother) just keep on re-appearing in new poems, including “Marlene Mae Talks About Denial” and “Marlene Mae’s Mother Turns Seventy-Six and Her Physician Asks If She Is Still Sexually Active.” Continue Reading

Contributor Spotlight: Tisha Nemeth-Loomis

The poems “Faith’s Other Shapes” and “Her Risk” explore reinvention, and the impossibility of emotional, physical, and relational wholeness in a culture that values fragmentation and isolation.

Writing is my way of being in the world. I am entirely at ease and fully “dialed in” when I am writing. Forming ideas and arranging them on the page is how I make sense of my surroundings and myself. Because of that, I continue to write—it’s never about the outcome as much as it is about the process, and the discoveries I have about myself while I am composing. Continue Reading